Before you go

Do you want updates to great book deals that appear for a limited time only?

x
Feedback

Tell us what's bugging you about the website.
We're here to help.

x

Troubles

$7.63

Winner of the 1970 lost Man Booker prize in 2010.

Major Brendan Archer travels to Ireland - to the Majestic Hotel and to the fiancée he acquired on a rash afternoon's leave three years ago. Despite her many letters, the lady herself proves elusive, and the Major's engagement is short-lived. But he is unable to detach himself from the alluring discomforts of the crumbling hotel. Ensconced in the dim and shabby splendour of the Palm Court, surrounded by gently decaying old ladies and proliferating cats, the Major passes the summer. So hypnotic are the faded charms of the Majestic, the Major is almost unaware of the gathering storm. But this is Ireland in 1919 - and the struggle for independence is about to explode with brutal force.

Buy at:

This book and all of its details (links, price, title, cover and description) are provided to you as is, by its author.

One Stop Fiction cannot be held accountable for any changes to the published price. Please check this before purchasing.

Report this book here if something's wrong.

What's wrong with this book?

x

Please provide at least one valid reason

A notification has been submitted. Thank you for taking the time to improve our community!

J.G. Farrell

J.G. Farrell, in full James Gordon Farrell (born Jan. 23, 1935, Liverpool, Eng.—died Aug. 12, 1979, Bantry Bay, Ire.) British novelist who won acclaim for his Empire trilogy, a series of historical novels that intricately explore British imperialism and its decline.

Farrell was born to an Irish mother and an English father, and he spent much of his childhood in Ireland. After attending boarding school in Lancashire, Eng., he studied at the University of Oxford, where in 1960 he received a degree in French and Spanish. While teaching at a lycée (secondary school) in France, Farrell started to write fiction. His debut novel, A Man from Elsewhere (1963), a cerebral narrative about a communist journalist attempting to expose a celebrated writer’s past, contains echoes of French existentialism. He followed it with The Lung (1965), in which he drew upon his own affliction with polio, which he contracted at Oxford, to present a downbeat portrait of an irascible man confined to an iron lung. On the strength of these two works, in 1966 Farrell won a fellowship to travel to the United States. While in New York City he published A Girl in the Head (1967), which tells in seriocomic fashion the story of a cynical eccentric living in an English seaside town.

View author's profile